PDP Exclusives by Rebecca

Friday, September 2, 2011

Ask Krissi's Art Studio: Painting On Fabric #1

Welcome to my very first post on Modern Rosies!  I'm so excited about this blog and think that everyone will find someone awesome here.  I have a LOT planned for you in the next several months, all in the true "Rosie" spirit including some recipes, indie business tips, home repair, gardening, auto maintenance and maybe even some life tips.  But today, it's arts & crafts!

Over the years as a crafter, quilter, fiber artist, mixed-media artist and now, painter (acrylics), I've gotten to know quite a few techniques and products.  Some I learned from others and some I learned by trial and error (oh, so very much error!).  That's why I will always share whatever I know (if I know it) with my fans and colleagues.  If you have a question for Krissi's Art Studio, just drop me an e-mail and I'll see if I can come up with an answer!


Krissi,

What do you use to seal the paint to fabric you paint on? You know, like on...say... THESE! 


Lost In Fabric-Land

hand-painted sugar skull on a BVG Expedient bag!
'Tree of Life' on a custom-ordered Krissi-Van-Gory bag.
Brandi wanted a diaper bag to match her nursery theme
and couldn't find a fabric that worked.  The answer?
CUSTOM PAINTED FABRIC!  Woo hoo!
Dear Land of the Lost,

Good question! Well, since I started out as a quilter, I have a collection of Jacquard Textile Colors, which are acrylic paints developed specifically for use on fabrics.  The colors are are heat set after they are fully dry.


If you already have paints and don't want to invest in the Jacquards, you don't have to.  I also use the artist acrylics you see in my paintings (Golden Fluid Acrylics) mixed with a little fabric medium.  There are a few choices out there for mixing mediums, but I've had great success with Jaquard's 'colorless' (#100) paint, and Golden's fabric mixative, GAC 900.




While we're on the topic of painting and coloring on fabric, let me share my favorite fabric markers, Fabrico by Tsukineko.  These pens bleed and fade much less than Sharpies and stay put once they have been properly heat set.  Trust me - I have done a LOT of outlining with markers on fabric!


Happy fabric customization to you!

Krissi
click  on "Welcome Home,"
 quilt to see just how much outlining
I'm talking about!  *whew!*
Thanks for joining all of us here on Modern Rosies!  I'll be back next week and every Thursday thereafter to share more tips, answer more questions and ... well, let's face it, make stuff up where I need to.  In the meantime, I hope you'll come back tomorrow for a great new post by another contributor!



Krissi Sandvik is a mixed-media artist and the owner of Krissi's Art Studio, home of Skelekitty and Friends.  She was recently named "best tutorialer on the web" by her friend Rachelle Rose.

7 comments:

  1. Oh the errors! The best learning curve.. ever!
    Awesome post Krissi!

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  2. Great post! Another big fan of Fabrico pens and pads too, I use them with my rubber stamps on fabric bags, canvas shoes and much most besides... really versatile!

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  3. Great post! Always great to have some cool info on crafts!

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  4. Very cool, thanks for sharing your tips- I've been wanting to experiment with painting and/or stamping on some of my own designs but have been unable to find the heat set paint locally.

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  5. Jenelle, most proper art supply stores carry them. Forget about places like Michaels and Aaron Bros. Just head to where your local college kids buy art supplies.

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  6. Wish I had this info 5 years ago! We did a quilt for my son's baby shower where everyone colored a square with a traced cartoon animal on it. It was ADORABLE!! But since we used fabric crayons, some of the squares are completely washed/faded off. ;( But now I know for when MY kids have kids! Thanks Krissi!

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  7. What an inspiring post! I've just been dipping my toes into this very subject, actually. Thank you for sharing these tips!
    (Also: did not know you started out as a quilter. That's fascinating!)

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